Posts Tagged ‘Q’ero Shamans’

Amantani Island

October 24, 2010
The Aramu Muru Doorway might have wanted us to stay a bit longer. At least that would be one explanation for what happened when we left the site to re-board our bus: the bus got stuck in the mud as the driver swung it around to pick us up. We trudged to the bus and the men in the group gathered to manhandle the bus into submission. They ignored the advice of the female engineer in the group and just resorted to brute force. It didn’t work. Another bus was called to collect us and after a brief delay, we were on our way to
the pier to board a boat for Amantani Island.
 
A Slight Delay

Amantani Island is an island of less than six square miles on the Peruvian side of Lake Titicaca. It is inhabited by less than 4000 Aymara people who speak Quechua and, some of them, a little Spanish. No English speakers here. There are half a dozen villages on its terraced hills and we were all going to be assigned to families to stay with for the night. We were told that the homes were simple adobe structures with no running water and little or no electricity. We would have beds and access to an outhouse. Our host families would feed us and we would have a little time to interact with them.

Approaching Amantani Island

The Solar Disc Activation ceremony would take place on the island, at two temples situated at its highest points. These temples, the Pachatata (Father) and Pachamama (Mother Earth) temples, were ancient places, each cared for by a guardian who kept them under lock and key, usually only opened for a ceremony each January 20, the annual feast day for the island. That they would be opened for the Solar Disc Activation ceremony was an usual and very special honor.

Our bus ride to the pier was long enough for me to observe and even chat with (through a translator) some of the Peruvian shamans who were participating in the ceremonies. To my surprise, I discovered that Q’ero shamans—or some of them—have cell phones these days. One of the men reached below his poncho and pulled out a cell phone to take a call as we bumped along on the road. I couldn’t quite reconcile the simplicity of these shamans with the complexity of having a cell phone. Where did he get it? Could he actually get a signal in the mountains where he lived? Was it even his phone, or one borrowed for the trip? I didn’t ask any of these questions, I just observed in stunned silence. 

A shaman from one of the floating reed islands, Romualdo Coila Coila, sat next to me on the drive. Romualdo handed me a business card that presented him as a Maestro Curandero. Nestor Caceres Escalante (a fellow traveler and a man of interest, himself) told me that Romualdo did ceremony to Pachamama, soul retrieval, coca leaf ceremony, and a variety of other shamanic activities. When I told Romualdo that I, too, do soul retrieval and a variety of other shamanic activities, he smiled and shook my hand. With Nestor’s help as translator, we chatted briefly about our work. Don Romualdo carried himself with a certain nobility and held a tightly packed internal power that could be felt as I sat next to him. He was a rugged looking man whose eyes and being emanated compassion.

And as I talked to him, I felt pulled to gift him with something I’d brought along that was stuffed in my pack—a round piece of malachite with a small hole in the middle that held a cord so it could be worn around the neck. I couldn’t reach get to it while on the bus, but I asked Nestor to tell him I had something for him that I would present later.

At the pier, we piled onto multiple boats for the rather long ride to Amantani Island. We all seemed to still be buzzing internally from our experiences at the Aramu Muru Doorway and that buzz was coupled with anticipation about the island and the ceremonies to come. 

Once on Amantani Island, I was able to retrieve the malachite necklace and as we walked toward the place where we would be doing ceremony, I stopped long enough to present it to Romualdo, who accepted it simply and with dignity. Later, I would see him pull it out from beneath his robe and show it to someone. It made me smile and I was glad to have been drawn to give him that token, small acknowledgment that it was.

Romualdo (in the black hat) Preparing for Ceremony

We gathered on a beach and Romualdo, accompanied by some of the Q’ero shamans, set about preparing his mesa for a despacho ceremony. This was to be a water ceremony and we would be making offerings to Lake Titicaca as a part of that ceremony. As Romulado set out his power objects, Jorge Luis Delgado spoke to us of water and spirit. He pointed out that water is alive and that whatever is alive can be communicated with. He said that water holds memory, listens, teaches, and shows us the way. “But what is the way?” he asked. “Just flow,” he said, answering his own question. 

If water represents the emotional body, then allowing ourselves to flow might be wise advice from Lake Titicaca. Jorge Luis made the provocative statement that the emotional body sometimes “covers the new codes.” The implication seemed to be that allowing ourselves to flow—as water does, effortlessly—might help us wash away resistance and release those new codes, or at least allow them to express themselves within us. 

Jorge Luis Speaks of Water and Spirit

“How do we connect with our own spirit?” Jorge asked. The real magic, he insisted, was our intent. As with other despacho ceremonies, we would be placing our intent into the coca leaves by breathing the intent into them. The ceremony would end with our taking our coca leaves to the lake in offering to her. 

Despacho

As we had done with air ceremony, we removed our shoes. Much to my chagrin, I was again wearing hose. I might have learned from air ceremony, but the hose were just too much a part of my personal ceremony for getting myself together that I hadn’t given it much thought that morning. Once again I was going to challenge a perfectly good pair of hose–this time by tromping over the rocky shore to Lake Titicaca. 

Romualdo conducted beautiful ceremony and, at the end, we each silently took our coca leaves to Lake Titicaca and made offering. It was a tricky scramble over rocks and the occasional broken glass on the beach, but we managed with as much composure as we could muster, teetering along. Once back in the circle, a young woman who had heard the story of the miracle of the pantyhose (which I had shared with a select few), teased me about my hosed feet. Surely, she proposed, I wouldn’t have gotten away without tears and runs this time. I looked at one foot and then the other. Then I lifted me feet so that she (sitting on the opposite side of the circle) could see. No runs. No tears. No holes.

 Copyright 2010 by Melanie Mulhall

 

The Aramu Muru Doorway

September 28, 2010

The difference between hearing about a place and experiencing it for yourself is akin to the difference between being told there is a God and having a mystical experience. There is no substitute for the experience. While Jorge Luis Delgado had written about and spoken of his rediscovery of a site that had come to be known as the Aramu Muru Doorway, I was keen to visit the place myself and had that opportunity the day following the Cutimbo air ceremony.

Near the Aramu Muru Doorway

Many years earlier, Jorge Luis had come upon the place, which was not far from a main highway, but which had seemingly gone unnoticed for a long time. He had been following a ley line down the valley in which the site sits and upon approaching, realized that it was special. The area was comprised of a large sandstone wall with a door-like indentation in it. Jorge asked permission of the place’s spirit guardian before approaching the “doorway” that he suspected was a portal to another dimension. What he experienced when he connected with the doorway was a flurry of visions, one of which was a vision of Aramu Muru passing through the doorway into another dimension.

Fellow Travelers at the Aramu Muru Doorway

Some years later, Jorge Luis began taking tours to the site and when a foreign journalist interviewed him about the place, he told the journalist about his experience there. The journalist published the story, proclaiming that Jorge Luis had rediscovered the ancient Aramu Muru doorway, and the name stuck.

Not only did the name stick, the place became somewhat famous.

But who was Aramu Muru, anyway? That depends on who you talk to. Some legends suggest that Aramu Muru was the first “priest/king” of the Incas, also known as Manco Kapac. It is said that he is the one who took the Solar Disc that had been hanging in the Sun Temple in Cusco and brought it to Lake Titicaca. The Solar Disc was believed to have originated in Lemuria and by bringing it to Peru, the Brotherhood of the Seven Rays (essentially, a group of Ascended Masters) was, in essence, establishing a presence there—a presence intended to foster brotherhood, service, and relationship with Spirit.

While visiting the Aramu Muru doorway would be a worthwhile endeavor at any time, it seemed particularly appropriate on February 13, 2010—one day before the Solar Disc activation ceremony was to take place. In fact, we were visiting the site while making our way to the dock where we would catch our boat to Amantani Island. There was symmetry to our going to the doorway at this time. It is thought that Lord Aramu Muru left the earthly realm by passing through a portal, disappearing into another realm—as Jorge Luis had seen in his vision—and we were about to continue his work by activating the Solar Disc.

The site is an impressive one. The doorway and two channels on either side of it are in the midst of a large stone wall. The stone is pinkish in color, reminiscent of our red rock in Colorado. The doorway itself is a bit wider and a bit shorter than what we might think of as a standard door and is indented.

Channels to the Left and Right, Doorway in the Middle

No, there are no hinges and no doorknob, nor is there no way to “open” the “door” using standard, physical methods. The door is wider at the top than the bottom with a small ledge on either side that can be used to rest one’s hands while kneeling in front of it. There is also a small, round indentation that some have suggested might be the place where Aramu Muru placed the Solar Disc to “open” the door. Jorge Luis has pointed out that this opening is more or less aligned with the third eye (depending a bit on one’s height) for those kneeling at the doorway.

Fellow Traveler Standing in a Channel

The channels on either side of the doorway are thought by some to balance the masculine and feminine energies. Jorge Luis noted, during his first experience with them, that they seemed to be energy vortexes, one spinning clockwise and the other counterclockwise. As our group approached the doorway, we spontaneously formed a line, each person stopping to position him or herself in the channel to the right of the doorway while waiting for a turn to experience the doorway, itself.

Q'ero Shamans

My experience of the channel was one of energy, which I felt coursing through me as I positioned myself snuggly within it. Just leaning against the channel stone sent vibration radiating through my body. Once at the doorway, I knelt and placed my forehead against the rock. And as I did, I felt the doorway thin and then dissolve, being replaced by an energetic portal. I passed through this portal and, once inside, saw three tunnels—one straight ahead and the others to my right and left.

Saint Germain (an Ascended Master and one of my personal guides, sitting on a council of twelve I often find myself before during meditation) appeared before me. He was delighted to find me there. He told me it was not yet time for me to pass down any of the tunnels, but assured me that, having found myself before them, I would be assisted by him in traveling down them during shamanic journey, dreams, and at other times when I was in an appropriate state to do so.

I came to understand that the first tunnel—the one straight ahead—led out into the cosmos and, from there, to many places. The tunnel to the right led (via tunnels that forked from it) to Mount Shasta, Amantani Island, Machu Picchu, and numerous other places that are connected energetically. The tunnel to the left led to Lemuria, which now seems to be in another dimension. At some point, I looked up and realized that there was a column of light piercing the space and branching into two other columns, thereby forming a v-shape over the area, connecting with the tunnels.

I was comfortable in this place with Saint Germain and didn’t really want to leave, although I did want to explore the tunnels. Still, some part of me knew that others were waiting on the other side of the doorway, back where my body was still connected to the stone wall. They wanted a chance to experience the doorway, too. I knew I needed to return. I also knew that now that I had been on the other side of the doorway, I could energetically return if I wished to do so.

Once back outside, I stood up and realized that I was only barely in my body and still very much in an altered state of consciousness. My entire body was vibrating and I could hardly move. I knew that it was pointless—not to mention unnecessary and maybe even counterproductive—to try to make my way to the second channel, so I did not even attempt it. One of the Q’ero shamans helped me down and I sat for a time, collecting myself a bit. Then I wandered the area around the doorway with one foot in alternate reality while the other was back on earth. I couldn’t talk, nor did I have any desire, really, to connect with anyone else. I was vibrating at a different frequency than usual and wanted to stay with it for a time.

Surrounding Area

It is said that some disappear through that doorway. I hadn’t disappeared, but I’d been through it  and I felt energetically aligned with the work to come.